How long will Timothy Hay stay fresh for my Guinea Pig?

How long will Timothy Hay stay fresh for my Guinea Pig?

 

Well, when thinking about this, it’s necessary to understand that hay is a natural product.  This means that over time it will naturally deteriorate.  But the good thing is that if it’s stored in the right manner, it can remain fresh and appetizing for your piggy for an extended period of time.

Of course, the hay needs to be of top quality in the first place, and then you also need to look at the place you store your hay.

The 3 main enemies of hay are as follows:

1 – Excessive moisture

2 – Excessive light

3 – Over handling.

Moisture:

Because hay is dried grass, it makes sense that moisture will prove harmful to it.  Ensure that your hay is stored in a place where it won’t be exposed to moisture – such as rain – or in humid conditions.  Both will quickly render hay inedible for your pet.

Light:

Both direct sunlight and harsh artificial light are harmful to hay.  Both will cause hay to become brittle and fragile, as well as leeching the nutritional content from it as well.

Over handling:

Hay doesn’t do well when over handled.  Every time it’s touched by man it undergoes some kind of destruction.  This means each time it’s packaged, moved and wrapped it becomes slightly damaged.  So too much handling can change lovely quality, fresh hay into something that your piggy won’t find particularly appetizing.

When over handled the stalks and heads of the hay break down.  This means you end up with small bits of chaffy hay, as opposed to long, fibrous strand that your pig will enjoy munching on.

This is one reason that Small Pet Select package and ships our hay in strong cardboard boxes.  Not only does it protect the hay, but it also keeps it in the optimum conditions (free from light and protected from moisture) to arrive at your home in the very best condition possible.  It’s also why we don’t wrap our hay in plastic packaging, as we feel this additional handling method is yet another step of handling that hay simply doesn’t need.

 

 

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