Totally fun ways to stop the chewing.

Confession time! How many of us have gone to plug in our smartphone, to charge our laptop, or to slip on our favorite flip flops only to find…total and utter destruction? Or, without being quite so dramatic, we saw the outline of bunny teeth? We’ve all been there and those mishaps usually occur at the worst time possible, like when our phone is dying.

Rabbits chew. It’s just part of their nature. The good news is there are plenty of ways to protect them from such dangers as electrocution and to protect our belongings at the same time. Let’s take a look at some of the totally fun ways you can keep your rabbits from chewing what they shouldn’t:

Provide plenty of chew toys.

Good news! You probably already have a ton of really fun chew toys right within your reach. Here are some popular and safe chew toys for rabbits:

  • Old phone books. Rabbits often love to chew and to shred phone books to pieces.
  • Paper bags are multipurpose. Your rabbit may decide that the paper bag is her hiding space or she might chew it. Either way, it’s a win-win for you.
  • Cardboard boxes are just like paper bags. They can be used as a hiding space (make sure there are two ways for your rabbit to get in and out of the box) and as a massive chew toy.
  • Mobiles. Instead of a baby mobile, opt for one made especially for your rabbit. A rabbit mobile allows your rabbit to chew and to tug on the mobile.
  • Apple branches. Mmm…mmm…apple branches are a great chew treat for rabbits. Just make sure they – and anything else you give your rabbit – is always untreated.
  • Straw brooms. Have you ever used a straw broom to sweep a porch or a room and your rabbit chased the broom, desperate to bite it? Straw brooms allow your rabbit to safely chew and shred.

Offer a digging box.

Is your rabbit a digger and a chewer? If you have holes on your bedsheets, blankets, on your furniture, or along your carpet, you’ve probably got a chewer who likes to dig. Create a safe digging box. All you need for a digging box is a cardboard box, an oversized litter box, or something similar that’s easy for your rabbit to jump in and out of. Fill the digging box with shredded paper – newspaper, for example – or hay and let her go crazy.

Give a clean, old towel or blanket.

Remember the rabbit who likes to dig and bite your good sheets? A clean cotton towel just might take her attention away from biting and chewing what she shouldn’t. However, pay careful attention to ensure she only bites and chews and doesn’t actually eat the fabric, which could cause serious health issues.

Warnings

You’ll find plenty of fun and safe ways to ensure your rabbit has safe ways to avoid chewing those dangerous wires and other household items. However, there are a few things you should keep in mind when you’re choosing what kind of toys to give your rabbit.

Avoid toys with non-food grade glues.

Make sure the toys you provide your rabbit only use food-grade glues. Avoid other types of glue, including the glue found on toilet paper and paper towel rolls. While rabbits love to chew those easy to toss rolls, the glue could result in illness.

Avoid toys with small parts.

Before giving your rabbit a toy, inspect it carefully to ensure there are no small parts that your rabbit can break off and swallow.

Rabbits chew. But, that chewing doesn’t have to be destructive if you provide your little one with plenty of toys to keep him mentally and physically stimulated. You might even want to try that old trick of rotating toys – like you might do with a child – so your rabbit doesn’t become bored with the toys she has. What are some of your rabbit’s favorite toys?

Resources:

http://rabbit.org/faq-toys/
http://www.rabbit.org/journal/3-6/chew-stick.html

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Beth Price-Williams
 

Writer and general lover of small animals, Beth has been a rabbit parent for 17 years and a professional writer for even longer. She lives with six rescue rabbits, who are her strictest editors, four budgies, a gecko, two goldfish, an African-clawed frog, and a human second grader, all of whom keep her on her toes. In addition to her love of writing about pets, Beth has covered Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania for Only In Your State for nearly two years.